Novel Synopsis ~ Lucha

I finally finished a draft of my novel Lucha that I was okay with calling finished. Very, very strange feeling. I just received the draft back from an editor and have some additions and changes to make (personal deadline = one week).

I am also working on the synopsis for this novel and am looking for feedback. From the basics of does it make sense to is it any good?

(And p.s. I started posting the novel by chapter on this site: Teresa Jordan Crimes. It’s a few drafts old, but if you’re interested in the first  chapters of one of the original drafts, you can find them there.)

Synopsis:

Teresa Jordan, a detective who has been suspended from every job she’s ever held, is wrapping up a drug trafficking case before serving her latest suspension. Moving between the U.S. and Mexico, she finds herself in the world of lucha libre wrestling where she sets her sights set on El Scorpion as the mastermind behind the drug operation. Teresa thinks she is close to wrapping up the case when the bodies of three young women dressed in the insignia of El Scorpion turn up on the border.

Ayanna Sanchez is the manager behind El Scorpion, a star wrestler and her brother. Ayanna has developed a large clientele of fans and bettors on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. She has teamed up with bookies, Saul and Carlos, and assures her brother that betting is perfectly legitimate in this business, but the money isn’t enough for her. She double-crosses the team of Saul and Carlos by partnering with drug traffickers who increase her revenue exponentially. The wrestling business works well as a cover operation, and she begins to hire a staff of young women whom she grooms to look, act and think like she does.

Lucha is the story of Teresa Jordan’s investigation of a triple homicide during an attempt to solve a drug-trafficking case. From the moment Teresa adds murder to the investigation, she’s thoroughly confused about who to trust, which only takes her deeper into the world of lucha libre wrestling and El Scorpion. Time seems to be running out, though, as another body turns up at the border, and Teresa appears to be the next target.

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editing, editing, editing

I think I failed to mention that a couple of weeks ago, I finished the draft of my book Lucha. 

I realized this as I someone asked me the other day, “by the way how’s your book coming?”

Oh yea, I said. It’s done.

Yes. Done. Done. Done! And through stage one of the editing process. This was a very basic edit. I went through for all the grammatical issues and typos I could find. I did a very cursory overview of anything that may not be entirely clear. A complete hand edit is done, and now I’m working to rewrite the changes on my computer.

I have to admit that I’m loving the process. Within hours of being done with my school year, I sat down and finished the pencil edits. The computer revisions are at about page 92.

This is my major writing goal for the summer. Well, one of them.

The other is to do a major overhaul of the first novel. The funny thing is I love that story so much, but I’m not thrilled with the structure anymore. I learned so much writing this second novel draft, and I think that it will definitely help me create a solid second draft of the other novel.

The other goal for this summer is to start publishing Lucha on a blog again. I started a while back and stopped for a variety of reasons (mostly what I now consider to be bad advice).

So, if you want to start at the beginning, check it out. At this time, I think I’m going to update it three times a week until the story is done. And simultaneously, I think this will help me revise again.

Always, always a work in progress…

staring: on writing

A friend and I have been listening to commencement speeches and sending them back and forth. The recent habit was inspired by a speech we listened to together. It was awful.

(The truth is, though, that there are some really great speeches out there. John Legend’s at the University of Pennsylvania from a few years back is probably my all time favorite. From it comes one of my favorite things to think about: the collision of sound and silence.)

A couple of days ago, I found Ann Patchett’s commencement address given at Sarah Lawrence in 2006. I loved this for this moment in my life because she talks about the journey of a writer.

What I found (funniest) most interesting was the concept of staring and how much time a writer spends staring.

Yesterday, I went to wash my car. I use one of those places where you put the quarters in the machine and wash it on your own with this little spray hose thing. Next to this place is an alley. And across from the alley was an apartment building. It was not very well-kept and on the door nearest to me was spray painted APT 3. It wasn’t well done. And I imagined that one day someone just got sick of knocks on the door asking for Apartment 1 and grabbed a spray can and wrote with loud, big, sloppy words. So there, it says.

On the steps sat a man. Hair every which way. Long beard. Smoking. A Jesus-looking figure, if you will. Minus the cigarette. So, as I dried the car, I stared at him. And from that staring came this entire story. An estranged daughter. An all-too-helpful son-in-law. A lifetime of struggles.

And then my mind went to something my father said to me last week. Your imagination is a little out of control.

It is.

When I sat down last night to get my chapters in on Lucha, I realized that my transition from the previous activity (in this case the Dodgers & yoga) requires staring. At nothing. Stare. Stare. Stare. Then, the words comes. Easily, really. And they don’t stop.

There’s really a lot to be said for staring.